By Tag:

Blog Subscribe:

Jake Cohan's Blog: Main Page

Soldier’s Joy tab and video

I recently slowed down one of my favorite fiddle tunes for use as an instructional video. Here is the tab for the arrangement shown. You can listen to the midi on Tabledit for free as well.

Below is the video of me playing through Soldier’s Joy. I play all of the rhythm parts and really slow down the A part.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Sheet Music, Videos of Jake | Comments Off on Soldier’s Joy tab and video

Musix and all things Dix Bruce

Dix Bruce is a guitar and Mandolin instructor who has published for, “Mandolin World News,” as well as, “Flatpick Guitar Magazine,” and his own publishing company. I highly regard all of his material as well as his authentic playing across many genres. From old-time fiddle music, to hot club gypsy jazz and all across the spectrum.

I learned this tune from a book of his on Gypsy Jazz

His playing is always tasteful and to the point, not a wasted note. A lesson in melody, and that less is often more. The flashy tricks are overrated in music. Tone, clarity, and expression are first priority. I encourage players at all levels to check out his contribution to the acoustic music world. Dix is up there with Steve Kaufman and Happy Traum in his legacy of clear accurate instruction for the self motivated musician.

Dix own website

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Inspiration, Videos of Jake | Comments Off on Musix and all things Dix Bruce

Some notes are more important than others

My intention is to simply scratch the surface of Music Theory in this post. Explanations are in the context of a rhythm guitar player named Jerry and a mandolin player named David jamming. My goal is to simplify this idea of scale degrees, having said this, this post is not for the very beginner. This post is for players who have put time into playing the major scale and understand each note in the scale correlates to one “scale degree.”

I argue that the 3rd and 7th scale degrees of any given scale have more harmonic importance. Lets look at some examples, sound clips will be added later for better understanding.

Jerry starts a song by strumming a C major chord.
David in turn is improvising on mandolin. He knows how to play his C major scale in order from practice. He knows all seven of those notes will sound good. They are:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C

David might choose to focus on the notes, E as well as B. Because they correlate to the 3rd and 7th scale degrees of the chord.

Now Jerry switches to playing a C7 chord on guitar.

David needs to change his seven scale degrees to choose from. Each correlating to one note. The C7 chord is also know as a dominant 7 chord. This chord has a flatted 7th scale degree instead of a natural 7th. David has a full scale containing 7 scale degrees to chose from. From the regular C major only one scale degree has changed, the 7th has to be flatted. David then gets these notes below to choose from.

C D E F G A Bb C

These notes will all sound good. David chooses to focus on the E as well as the one note that changed the Bb. Bb being the flatted 7th scale degree and the only scale degree that changed from the simple C major scale.

Now Jerry starts a new song he has learned, it starts with the strumming of a Cminor chord.

David is coming up with his set of scale degrees to chose from in terms of notes he can play on the mandolin. Only one scale degree changes from the original C major scale. The 3rd scale degree needs to flattened. Also known as a flat 3rd.

C D Eb F G A B C

On mandolin David is soloing…Since a C minor chord is the sound being heard he might focus on Eb the flatted 3rd scale degree. As well as the 7th scale degree which is a B note

Jerry is now playing you a Cmaj7 chord, which usually appear in jazzier songs.

The scale degrees David uses as a template does not change. What changed is the chord Jerry is playing, he is including the 7th scale degree in the chord. Instead of a C major which is simply 1st-3rd-and 5th scale degrees, Jerry is playing the 1st-3rd-5th-and 7th scale degrees.

David on mandolin has the exact same template of scale degrees he used for C major over a C major 7 chord
C D E F G A B C

David plays the 3rd and 7th scales degrees. The E note and the B note. The B note being a defining part of Jerry’s major 7 chord sound.

In another jam session Cmin7 chord is being strummed by Jerry.

David knows a C minor 7 chord consists of a flatted 3rd scale degree, to make it minor, as well as the flatted 7th scale degree. David’s seven notes to choose from changes by only two scale degrees, the 3rd scale degree and the 7th scale degree.
C D Eb F G A Bb C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

I hope this helps, if it doesn’t I am sure I can find a link to an article written by someone much better at describing this dry music theory stuff. When I say focus on the 3rd and 7th I am not excluding other notes. Many other notes sound great, these two just have a big part in chord construction. Also the 1st scale degree as well as the 5th scale degree are often played by a bass player, or by Jerry’s rhythm playing, plucking bass notes.

For my example above, I am in a way working backwards based on the chord you are playing. Any and all chords can be deconstructed, hence Chords with names like E7b9 or G7#5, these altered Dominant chords are not common in bluegrass, but are common in jazz standards. This makes for the argument that this trick is more important in jazz than bluegrass.
In chord charts it is useful to know that
b=flat
#=sharp

Comments and questions encouraged. Anyone who can expand on this, or has their own tricks involving focusing on certain scale degrees please speak up.

Posted in General, Inspiration | Comments Off on Some notes are more important than others

Sailing to Denver in 2014

Come out tonight to the Tin Roof Cantina. We have lots of gigs coming up we would love for you to join us.

Tags: , ,
Posted in General | Comments Off on Sailing to Denver in 2014

New two-point mandolin

Below is a video where I play Bourree II by J.S. Bach. I am playing my Korean built, oval hole, mystery mandolin. No serial number, but sounds and plays great. Especially in Jazz or Classical context. Tabs and notation for this provided by Mel Bay’s, “J.S. Bach for Mandolin.”

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Videos of Jake | Comments Off on New two-point mandolin

Patreon, a new idea in artistic expression

I am usually skeptical when officially joining any group, especially those that only exist in the world of the internet. Despite that I was turned on to a new website by my web developer, Jeff Cohan at Nsiteful

I couldn’t find a downside to joining, but check it out for yourself. To view content it is free and does not require joining. Supporting artists, as well as sharing one;s own art does require joining, but no necessary costs. It is similar to a site like kickstarter, but for the individual. More like a Donate button on a website but providing much more than that. The site also compiles content in an organized ways similar to that you tube channels. Check out the link below to see what you think?

Jake Cohan at Patreon

One thing I really like is that encourages the sharing of great content for free and reasonable prices, instead of proprietary ownership of content to the highest bidder. The consumers get to decide what content is worth not the owners.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in General | Comments Off on Patreon, a new idea in artistic expression

Part of, “The Godfather,” suite.

Below is a video where I explore an exotic scale. An exotic scale being any scale that contains intervals specific to a region or cultural sound. More of these to come. This is a scale I think sounds best in Italian music or even some Eastern, Chinese or Japanese traditional sounds. I can tab out this specific scale and song if people request it.

Also, playing songs in the key of F major is touched on towards the end of the video. More tips and tricks on use of exotic scales. Ie. (Harmonic Minor,) in French hot “gypsy,” jazz. Often pigeon holed as the snake charming sound. This scale’s applications also work really well in flamenco music, specifically a mode of the harmonic minor called Spanish Phrygian. Also, more in depth analysis of playing in F major to come, so stay posted.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Videos of Jake | Comments Off on Part of, “The Godfather,” suite.

Jacobson and Mold’s work, great for the Atlanta Mandolin scene

Being an Atlanta native I get especially excited to find local builders. Marty Jacobson is a phenomenal talent working out of Suwanne, GA. His use of the newest technology, and brilliant design make Jacobson mandolins sound amazing, and cost less. One of the few win, win situations I know of. Please check out his site. A link is provided at the end of this entry. (Oh yeah he’s a hell of a player too).

The second man mentioned is also a great mandolin player, as well as a great instructor. David Mold, easily found with his many great youtube videos, he uses Jacobson mandolins and gets them sounding crystal clear. That’s only part of his contribution. He has a site, not very different from my own, in terms of layout and over all mission statement. He has insightful blog entries, videos, instruction, and links for further study, all of which are of the finest quality. His hub is called, Mandoliniana

Marty’s showcase with notes for fellow builders can be found at, Marty Jacobson’s Fine Acoustic Instruments

Check these guys out no matter where your from. Marty is on back order but who knows when he might make your future mandolin, as for David’s Mandoliniana, any player can benefit from hearing his beautiful playing, as well as learning from such a great player.

Keep Delving,
Jake

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in General | Comments Off on Jacobson and Mold’s work, great for the Atlanta Mandolin scene

Duke Ellington phrasing, make it swing.

The chords for this little exercise are as follows:

G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, D7, G
G, D7, Em, D, C, Bm, Am, G

Jethro Burns published this a while ago as a way to get your playing swinging. < - -, < - -,.... < means strong or accented, - meaning weak or not accented, Think: STRONG, weak, weak, STRONG, weak, weak, STRONG, weak, weak, STRONG This can be used with a band or a metronome to accent your favorite melody or any playing one wants to get away from the straight 8th notes feel.

Every player has rhythmic nuances that literally need to be heard to understood. Books and notation can only touch the surface. Think of Clarence White in the bluegrass world, or Wayne Shorter in the Jazz world. Playing right in front, or or behind the downbeat of a tune can really make a song chug along or glide smoothly. Wayne and his band create lots of movement with the phrasing of his horn and the comping of the piano and bass in the backdrop. They don’t change the tempo as much as they play, “around,” the beat not right on top of it. Below Horace Silver really gets it on piano!

In terms of lead playing, Miles Davis as well as guitar greats like Charlie Christian, Pat Martino and Django are great guys to listen to for new poly-rhythmic ideas to wrap one’s ears around. In terms of piano playing and comping, Horace Silver as well as Bill Evans and Keith Jarrett are players with great senses of time. Below is a video of Wayne Shorter playing some Ellington-esque phrasing, as well as some other ideas I must call all his own. Altered timing is a great way to reveal one’s own unique voice, while dodging the ever tempting trap door of playing too many notes. One clear convicted voice is the goal, don’t be afraid to borrow from your favorite players. Use the stepping stones provided, but remember to tread your own path along the way.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Videos of Jake | Comments Off on Duke Ellington phrasing, make it swing.

Music without genre classifications

Some of acoustic musics greatest contributors are often overlooked, usually from a lack of material that is easily marketed and turned into profit. This is no coincidence, this is a symptom in the nature of our times. Music is it’s own language, in and of itself. We must move past using names like, “Country, Bluegrass, Jazz and classical,” to define what is an art form with it’s very own vocabulary.

Players like Jordan Ramsey, Dave Peters, and Tim Connell often play multiple styles within a single song. In terms of genres this music must fall into, “all of the above.” What makes music hard to define is exactly what gives it more interest and intrigue. No more pigeon holed definitions are needed.

Chris Thile just released an album, which consists only pieces composed by the great J.S. Bach. Before the release of this album Thile was not considered a classical player, nor we he be in the future. But his classical mandolin playing is up there with the best I have ever heard. Do you see the problem here? I can same the same for Mike Marshall’s/strong> playing of classical music. Another player not considered in the classical genre.

Both have devoted lots of time and effort into this particular style. Naturally, after a certain amount of time a new style, or composer is needed freshen things up. An example of this would be Marshall’s change to playing Brazilian music. Another good example is Tony Rice’s movement towards Jazzier playing, and away from what we call bluegrass. Bluegrass is unique in that it is a genre created by a single man, the master Bill Monroe. There is one and only Bill Monroe. “So it goes,” as Kurt Vonnegut would say.

Jethro Burns called many names, but never a conformist, broke all the right rules. As a musical revolutionary, he lead the way for David Grisman’s Dawg music, as well as all that was labeled Newgrass, and jazzgrass, over the years. Well before that players like Dave Apollon played music beyond definition.

Dave Apollon a Russian mandolin player wrote and performed beautiful music, later called Gypsy Jazz. Django Reinhardt’s very own musical genre creation. Not bad company, but their music must speak for itself, two words do not do it justice. Don’t listen to me, or any other critic for that matter, listen to the emotional, and powerful music they played.

Every artist named is in bold print for a reason. The reason being so one can listen to these artists and draw his or her own conclusions. No one song, or name, can suffice in revealing the broad, yet strong foundations these men have built for future generations of musicians. With inspiration from the masters of the past, one’s own unique voice can be found and expressed.

We must adapt and continue building onto an art form that has luckily been built to last. The ones most willing to adapt, and change with the times, are in my opinion the most fit to be truly original and innovative.

“What is in a name?” Just that, nothing more. Do not mistake the name for the thing it represents. Be it a person, place, or thing, let your heart do the deciding. Your analytical rational mind will always be there to fall back on. Music is beyond names, it evokes emotion not logic, inspirational not instructive, feelings not answers.

We all could be a little less critical and more accepting in thoughts and actions. This is a ticket that can unleash creative prowess beyond imagination. Tapping into the true source, as many before us have.

Paying homage to the traditions of the past holds huge importance. The assumption that the builders wanted us to carry these traditions unchanged, like relics of the past, is inevitably impossible. Build off of traditional music in ways that feel good to you, and chances are it will have the same effect on others. Trust your gut, and play from your heart.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in General, Inspiration | Comments Off on Music without genre classifications

« Older Entries |

free winrar

free winrar

download winrar free

download winrar free

windows 7 ultimate product key

windows 7 ultimate product key

winrar free

winrar free

windows 7 key generator

windows 7 key generator

windows xp product key

windows xp product key

windows 7 activation crack

windows7 activation crack

winrar download free

winrar download free

windows 7 product key

windows 7 product key

windows 7 crack

windows 7 crack

free winzip

free winzip

winzip free download full version

winzip free download full version

winrar free download

winrar free download

winzip free download

winzip free download

winzip activation code

winzip activation code

winzip registration code

winzip registration code

winzip freeware

winzip freeware

free winrar download

free winrar download